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'New York Times' Names Mark Thompson As CEO

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'New York Times' Names Mark Thompson As CEO

Business

'New York Times' Names Mark Thompson As CEO

'New York Times' Names Mark Thompson As CEO

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Mark Thompson is a former BBC executive, and he will face a different business model from the non-profit British broadcaster. The paper is run by a board that's largely elected by a family trust. Thompson will start in November. The paper has been without a chief since last December.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the top man at The Times.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The New York Times has named its new president and CEO. The man who got the job is Mark Thompson, a former BBC executive. Thompson will face a different business model from the non-profit British broadcaster. The paper is run by a board that's largely elected by a family trust.

Thompson spent more than 30 years with the BBC - rising up through the ranks as a journalist. During his tenure there, he oversaw spending cuts of more than one and a half billion dollars.

Mark Thompson will start at The New York Times in November. It's been without a chief since last December. The Times hired outside of the print world, hoping to increase its digital offerings and spark sales growth.

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