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Double Bacon Corn Dog Delights Iowa Fair Goers

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Double Bacon Corn Dog Delights Iowa Fair Goers

Business

Double Bacon Corn Dog Delights Iowa Fair Goers

Double Bacon Corn Dog Delights Iowa Fair Goers

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Local TV station KCRG reports Campbell's Concessions prepared 12,000 double bacon corn dogs ahead of the fair, but they sold out in less than three days. Additional workers had to be called in to prep more dogs.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And let's talk about one more bright spot in the American economy - anything that is wrapped in bacon.

Today's last word in business is the double bacon corn dog.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yeah. Vendors at the Iowa State Fair delighted - or disgusted - consumers when deep-fried butter made its debut last year. Well, this year, Campbell's Concessions took a hotdog, wrapped it in bacon, dipped it in corn batter, which is infused with even more bacon, and they dropped it, where else, into a deep fryer.

(LAUGHTER)

INSKEEP: Local TV station KCRG reports that Campbell's prepared 12,000 double bacon corn dogs ahead of the fair, thinking they'd be set for most of the week, but they sold out in fewer than three days. Additional workers had to be called in to prep more dogs.

GREENE: Campbell's said that the treat - or I mean, whatever you want to call it - has brought in about $3,000 in sales each day. I mean, who knows, maybe next year the Iowa State Fair will be selling cholesterol medication - wrapped in bacon.

Well, that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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