Theme Park Offers WiFi With Roaming Donkeys

A theme park in Israel depicts life in the first and second centuries. The Times of Israel describes it as "a Galilean version of Colonial Williamsburg." But there were no cell phones back then. Routers have been installed throughout the park in packs that donkeys carry.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. And our last word in business today is Wi-Fi donkeys. Just follow along here.

A theme park in Israel called Kfar Kedem, or Village of Yore, depicts life in Israel in the first and second centuries. The Times of Israel describes it as a Galilean version of Colonial Williamsburg.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

There are stone buildings, goats roaming around and people dressed in period costumes. There were however, no cell phones back in the first century. But the owners of this theme park wanted to offer Wi-Fi to visitors who are dependent on the 21st century technology, you know, so they can make calls and upload photos of what they're seeing in videos right away.

INSKEEP: So, of course, routers have been installed throughout the park on the backs of donkeys. The routers are tucked into bags the donkeys carry. The tech website DVICE says it's not clear why park management did not just put the routers in hidden spots, but suggests that maybe it has something to do with hills getting in the way of wireless signals. It is not clear whether the park manager is charging roaming fees.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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