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Bernanke Defends His Efforts To Lift Economy

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Bernanke Defends His Efforts To Lift Economy

Business

Bernanke Defends His Efforts To Lift Economy

Bernanke Defends His Efforts To Lift Economy

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160388169/160386698" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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In a much-anticipated speech Friday, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke spoke about the "nontraditional" measures he's had to use to boost the economy. The Fed can't use the traditional tool — lowering interest rates — because rates are already so low. At a meeting of central bankers in Jackson Hole, Wyo., Bernanke also warned about the dangers of the stagnant labor market.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the latest comments from Ben Bernanke

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The chairman of the Federal Reserve defended his policies in a much-anticipated speech today in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. At a yearly meeting of central bankers, Bernanke spoke about the non-traditional measures he's had to use to boost the U.S. economy. The Fed can't use the traditional tool, lowering interest rates, because rates are already so low. Bernanke also warned about the dangers of the stagnant labor market and said he will do more as needed to promote a stronger recovery.

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