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Author Caught Writing His Own Glowing Review

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Author Caught Writing His Own Glowing Review

Business

Author Caught Writing His Own Glowing Review

Author Caught Writing His Own Glowing Review

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160526302/160526711" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Best-selling novelist R.J. Ellory was caught anonymously writing positive reviews of his own work on Amazon. Ellory praised himself for his magnificent genius.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Today's last word in business is really written by Steve Inskeep.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And really written by David Greene. We feel obliged to mention that because a British author is in trouble for writing under a pseudonym.

GREENE: Amazon, the bookselling site, allows people to write short reviews of books. And the best-selling novelist R.J. Ellroy was caught anonymously writing glowing reviews of his own work.

INSKEEP: Mr. Ellroy praised himself for his, quote, "magnificent genius."

GREENE: He even went on to write reviews of rival writers, deriding one book as "same old, same old."

INSKEEP: After being caught, Mr. Ellroy has apologized. And today, dozens of best-selling writers have placed a letter in Britain's Daily Telegraph denouncing the practice.

GREENE: They used their own names.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News, which is spectacular, according to the review I'm looking at. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MACK THE KNIFE")

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