A $17 Million Vegas Buffet

Caesars Palace just spent $17 million on a new buffet, featuring hundreds of high-end food items.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business takes us to the faux Roman Empire that stands for everything that is the opposite of austerity. We are, of course, talking about Caesars Palace in Vegas, baby.

Some people go to Caesars Palace to gamble, others to see spectacular shows and some go for the extravagance that is the buffet. Caesars Palace is trying to top them all. This week it opened the $17 million Bacchanal Buffet. It is about the size of half a football field, from wood-fired pizzas to sushi and shrimp and grits. The buffet boasts more than 500 options. Unlike many other Vegas buffets, we're told it's no bargain. Dinner is priced around $35 a person. Now, with this kind of decadence, whatever happens in Vegas will not necessarily be staying in Vegas. You'll have to bring a bigger belt for the trip home.

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INSKEEP: Yeah, that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News, baby. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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