MOMA To Display Munch's 'The Scream'

The most expensive work of art ever sold at auction is going on public display at New York's Museum of Modern Art. For six months starting in late October, museum-goers can stare into the abyss suggested by Munch's iconic image of a screaming man beneath a swirling orange sky.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is - well, a question. What does $120 million look like when it's hung on a wall?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

I happen to know the answer to that question. The answer is a scream - actually, "The Scream," the painting by Edvard Munch. The most expensive work of art ever sold at auction is now going on public display at New York's Museum of Modern Art.

MONTAGNE: For six months starting in late October, museum-goers can stare into the abyss suggested by Munch's iconic image of a screaming man beneath a swirling, orange sky.

INSKEEP: It's one of four versions done by the Norwegian artist, and the only one in the United States. The anonymous buyer, who is temporarily sharing the expensive acquisition, is thought to be a New York financier.

MONTAGNE: He or she may be anonymous but hopefully, is not putting both hands on the side of his or her head while howling about the purchase. And that's the business news from MORNING EDITION. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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