'Forbes' List: Richest People In America

Forbes magazine is out with its yearly list of the 400 richest Americans. Their combined net worth increased 13 percent since last year. The top of the list contains the usual suspects: Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Larry Ellison, the Koch brothers and the children of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business today is: the rich getting richer.

Forbes magazine just came out with its yearly list of the 400 richest Americans. Their combined net worth increased 13 percent since last year.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here are some of the people who can certainly afford any kind of phone they want: Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Larry Ellison, the Koch brothers and the children of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton.

And remember how we told you at the top of the business news that Google is expected to trump Facebook in digital ad revenues this year? Well, the Forbes list contains a little more bad news for Mark Zuckerberg.

MONTAGNE: The Facebook CEO was the 14th wealthiest American last year, but Facebook's falling stock price has dragged Zuckerberg's net worth down to a mere $9.4 billion, making him only the 36th-richest American.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FOR THE LOVE OF MONEY")

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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