Want An iPhone 5 But Don't Want To Stand In Line?

American consumers will likely go to great lengths to get the iPhone 5, which goes on sale Friday. People are lining up in front of Apple stores. Time is money which explains why some people are paying others to stand in line for them. On man in San Francisco is getting $55 to stand in line for four hours.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Why wait?

American consumers will likely go to great lengths - and stand in lines of great lengths - to get the iPhone 5, which goes on sale today.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

People are lining up in front of Apple stores already. But this is a market economy, after all, and time is money, which explains why some people are paying others to stand in line for them.

IAN DEBORHA: I'm getting paid $55 for four hours.

INSKEEP: Fifty-five dollars. We reached Ian Deborha(ph) while he was standing in line early this morning in San Francisco.

MONTAGNE: He brought a down sleeping bag and snacks, and is apparently underequipped compared to some people in line.

DEBORHA: Some other guys I see have camp stoves and stuff, have been here a bit longer. They've probably been here since last night. They've been making Ramen.

INSKEEP: Sounds tasty. Mr. Deborha says he's done this before when he was buying an iPhone 4, but this is the first time he's being paid for his patience.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News.

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