NPR logo

Rising Income Gap Shapes Residential Segregation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161650263/161655319" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Rising Income Gap Shapes Residential Segregation

Rising Income Gap Shapes Residential Segregation

Rising Income Gap Shapes Residential Segregation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/161650263/161655319" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mechelle Baylor's home in the Shaw area of Washington, D.C., has been in her family since 1929. She says she's seen her neighborhood change a lot as her neighbors move out and higher-income earners move in. Amy Held/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amy Held/NPR

Mechelle Baylor's home in the Shaw area of Washington, D.C., has been in her family since 1929. She says she's seen her neighborhood change a lot as her neighbors move out and higher-income earners move in.

Amy Held/NPR

In this week's podcast of weekends on All Things Considered, a look at how money shapes the way we live now. Also, Florida's Highwaymen, and the novel, The People of Forever Are Not Afraid. Plus, actor Michael Peña, the rare butterfly-moth-entomologist-marriage, and guitarist Elliott Sharp.