7-Eleven To Tally Coffee Cup Election Results

The convenience store chain is allowing customers to choose: coffee in a blue cup for President Obama, or a red cup for Mitt Romney. And for the undecided, or those just indifferent to politics, they can request a plain cup. The company tabulates the choices at the register and results are posted daily on its 7-Election website.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today which is: caffeine and campaign.

Once again this election season, 7-Eleven stores are testing the sentiments of the American public. OK, make that the coffee-drinking American public.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The convenience store chain is allowing customers to choose: coffee in a blue cup for President Obama, or a red cup for Mitt Romney. And for the undecided, or those just indifferent to politics - or those voting Libertarian - they can request a plain old cup. The company tabulates the choices at the register and results are posted daily on its 7-Election website, which was created just for the poll.

GREENE: And as of this morning - the drum roll - the website chose Mr. Obama ahead of Romney and 58 percent to 42 percent. The coffee cup promotion has accurately predicted the outcome of the last three presidential elections, but 7-Eleven stresses that its survey is quote, "unabashedly unscientific."

INSKEEP: And there's still time. There's still time left before the end of the election.

GREENE: There it is. And we're learning nothing from our coffee cups, Steve. Mine is black and it looks like yours is white.

INSKEEP: You learn from mine that my daughter painted this coffee cup.

GREENE: It is very pretty.

INSKEEP: Yeah. Anyway. That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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