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On Google Maps, Lens Flares Look Like UFOs

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On Google Maps, Lens Flares Look Like UFOs

Business

On Google Maps, Lens Flares Look Like UFOs

On Google Maps, Lens Flares Look Like UFOs

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/162203088/162203199" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People in Texas, New Mexico and South Carolina have noticed strange pink shapes in the air on Google Maps Street View. They look just like UFOs in a sci-fi movie. One local TV station in South Carolina had an expert take a look. His conclusion: lens flares.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: unidentified.

Apple has been much criticized for new iPhone software. It erases the Google Maps function that a lot of people like and replaces it with Apple's own maps of the world, which have been criticized for leaving out seemingly vital information - like roads, entire towns, things that were on the map when Apple still used Google.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Well, there's something else Google Maps has that Apple doesn't, unidentified flying objects. People in Texas, New Mexico and South Carolina have noticed strange pink shapes in the air on Google Maps Street View. They look just like UFOs in a sci-fi movie.

INSKEEP: One local TV station in South Carolina had an expert take a look. And his conclusion was: lens flares, light reflecting on the lens of the camera - not ET phoning home.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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