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Pizza Hut Rethinks Debate Promotion

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Pizza Hut Rethinks Debate Promotion

Business

Pizza Hut Rethinks Debate Promotion

Pizza Hut Rethinks Debate Promotion

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/162992960/162992994" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The company offered 30 years' worth of pizza to anybody at Tuesday night's presidential town hall meeting who asks the candidates, "Sausage or pepperoni?" Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert asked, "What could be more American than using our electoral process for product placement?"

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Pizza Hut does not sell waffles, but they're waffling. The company offered 30 years worth of pizza to anybody at tonight's presidential town hall meeting who asks the candidates sausage or pepperoni. The promotion backfired. Stephen Colbert asked: What could be more American than using our electoral process for product placement. Pizza Hut has since suggested it is rethinking the contest, but it will still honor the prize if somebody does pose the question tonight. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

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