Target Begins Running Holiday TV Ads Early

Traditionally, Target has held off on unveiling its Christmas season ads until after Thanksgiving. Social media has buzzed with shock that the chain was breaching holiday decorum.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Are you ready?

(SOUNDBITE OF TARGET COMMERCIAL)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: The holidays are coming, and they're going to be big.

MONTAGNE: Target has aired its first holiday ad of the season.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let me just get my face out of my palm here. That's right. Forget planning your Halloween costume or picking out a turkey. Target is making its mark early - six weeks before Thanksgiving, in fact. It had a lot of people double-checking their calendar.

MONTAGNE: The Target ad stars the company's mascot, Bullseye the dog, bringing holiday tidings to a snowy Main Street. The strategy is new for Target.

INSKEEP: Traditionally, it's held off on unveiling its Christmas season ads until after Thanksgiving. And social media has buzzed with shock that the chain was breaching holiday decorum.

MONTAGNE: But it turned out Target was far from being first to jump on the holiday bandwagon. Radio station KYXE in Yakima, Washington switched to its all-Christmas music format last week.

INSKEEP: Oh, I'm OK with that, actually. That's fine.

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news from MORNING EDITION on NPR News. Happy Holidays, Steve.

INSKEEP: Thank you.

MONTAGNE: I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

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