Pacino To Earn $125,000 Per Week In 'Glengarry'

Actor Al Pacino is returning to Broadway in November to star in David Mamet's classic play, Glengarry Glen Ross. He's playing a different character from the one he playd in the movie version 20 years ago. According to Bloomberg News, he's making $125,000 per week, plus a cut of the show's profits — one of the biggest pay packages ever for a Broadway performer.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is happy huckster.

Actor Al Pacino is returning to Broadway in November to star in David Mamet's classic play "Glengarry Glen Ross," which became very famous, even though the title is so hard to say. In the movie version, Pacino plays the sleazy, successful real estate salesman Ricky Roma.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS")

AL PACINO: (as Ricky Roma) Do you think you're a thief? So what? You get befuddled by a middle-class morality? Get shut of it. Shut it out.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now, on stage, 20 years after the film version, Pacino will play the role of Shelly Levine, an older, washed-up salesman who can't close a deal.

INSKEEP: It's plain, though, that Pacino was able to close the deal for this role. According to Bloomberg, Pacino's making $125,000 per week, plus a cut of the show's profits.

MONTAGNE: It's one of the biggest pay packages ever for a Broadway performer. Pacino is collecting even more than Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane in "The Producers."

INSKEEP: Even more than Hugh Jackman and Daniel Craig in "A Steady Rain."

MONTAGNE: And he's collecting 71 times more than the basic union rate on Broadway.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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