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Remembering Some Of The Lives Lost In Sandy

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Remembering Some Of The Lives Lost In Sandy

Remembering Some Of The Lives Lost In Sandy

Remembering Some Of The Lives Lost In Sandy

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Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep take a moment to remember some of the lives lost in Superstorm Sandy. Of the more than 90 people killed by the storm, many were in Staten Island.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We've been giving you the number of dead from Hurricane Sandy. More than 90 people have been killed by the storm. Over 40 of those deaths were in New York; and many on Staten Island, across the harbor from Manhattan.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here are a couple of the stories behind the numbers. Glenda Moore(ph) tried to escape the water with her two sons, age 2 and 4. The car stalled. She left her car with her boys - carrying a toddler, holding the older one's hand. Surging floodwaters swept the boys away. The mother survived.

MONTAGNE: And then there is John Filapovich(ph), a 20-year-old Marine, and his father, John. They decided to brave the storm despite orders to evacuate. They were found dead together, in their swamped basement, hugging.

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