Floor Makeover Takes 3 Weeks, 250,000 Pennies

In Garfield, Pa., the owner of a tattoo shop wanted to spruce up her floors. Mel Angst of the Artisan Tattoo and Coffee Gallery went with pennies — 250,000 of them. She recruited some volunteers, and they spent three weeks painstakingly gluing pennies to the floor. It took about 400 hours.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Pinching Pennies.

In Garfield, Pennsylvania, the owner of a tattoo shop wanted to spruce up her floors. She could have gone with a nice tile or parquet.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Instead, Mel Angst of the Artisan Tattoo and Coffee Gallery went with pennies - 250,000. She recruited some volunteers, and spent three weeks painstakingly gluing pennies to the floor.

MONTAGNE: It took about 400 hours. The new floor looks great, and Angst says she saved a pretty penny on materials. Turns out gluing money to the floor can be cheaper than buying tile.

INSKEEP: I guess it's easier to figure out the cost per square floor.

MONTAGNE: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, PENNY LANE)

THE BEATLES: (Singing) There beneath the blue suburban skies. Penny Lane.

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