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MIT Shirt Fools Florida Poll Workers
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MIT Shirt Fools Florida Poll Workers

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MIT Shirt Fools Florida Poll Workers

MIT Shirt Fools Florida Poll Workers
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In Boca Raton, Fla., BocaNewsNow reports a woman showed up with a shirt that said Mitt. She was denied entry to vote. But a closer inspection of her shirt showed the Republican candidate's first name was misspelled. An election supervisor let her vote after confirming the shirt said MIT, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Florida's voting trouble includes the saga of a woman in Boca Raton. You may not bring campaign propaganda to a polling station. BocaNewsNow reports she showed up yesterday with a shirt that said Mitt. She was denied entry to vote.

But a closer inspection of her shirt showed the Republican candidate's first name was misspelled. An election supervisor let her vote after confirming the shirt said MIT - the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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