'Halo 4' Has Successful First Day Of Sales

The latest installment from Microsoft's blockbuster video game series, which pits humans against aliens in the future, was released last week. It made more than $220 million in the first day sales. That's more than the second Harry Potter movie, which holds the record for the biggest film opening.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Our last word in business today is: arms race.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Dramatic. Feel the heart beat. That's music from "Halo 4," the latest installment from Microsoft's blockbuster video game series which pits humans against aliens in the future. Last week, "Halo 4" made more than $220 million in the first day sales.

WERTHEIMER: That's more than the second "Harry Potter" movie, which holds the record for the biggest film opening. But "Halo 4" is probably more focused on beating its video game archrival, "Call of Duty."

INSKEEP: That series latest title, "Black Ops 2," just came out. And while there are no sales figures yet, we do have the numbers for the first "Black Ops" title.

WERTHEIMER: It raked in more than $650 million in sales in five days alone.

And that's the business news, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.