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Latin Roots: The Conga

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Latin Roots: The Conga

Latin Roots: The Conga

Latin Roots: The Conga

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/165286974/165294761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Dizzy Gillespie's "Manteca" is one of the earliest examples of Afro-Cuban jazz. Herman Leonard hide caption

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Herman Leonard

Dizzy Gillespie's "Manteca" is one of the earliest examples of Afro-Cuban jazz.

Herman Leonard

Playlist

  • Felix Contreras, "Conga Demo"
  • Dizzy Gillespie, "Manteca"
  • Giovanni Hidalgo, "The Conga"

In this edition of "Latin Roots," Alt.Latino correspondent Felix Contreras discusses the history and the impact of the conga — or more properly known as the tumbadora — in Cuba and abroad. Originally from Africa, the conga became a critical instrument in Afro-Cuban religious culture.

Contreras talks about the varying techniques and styles one can produce with the conga — and gives a short demonstration in our studio. From guaguancó to rumba and the cha-cha-chá, the instrument is fundamental to a number of different rhythms.

Listen to the "Latin Roots" conga playlist on Spotify.


Latin Roots from World Cafe is made possible by a grant from the Wyncote Foundation.

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