More And More Airline Flights Are Filled To Capacity

Airlines are always crowded during the Thanksgiving holiday. But if you've had the feeling they're becoming more crowded all the time, it's not just your imagination. On average, more than 80 percent of airline seats have been filled and plenty of flights have been packed to capacity.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with fewer flights and less room on them.

Of course airlines are always crowded during the Thanksgiving holiday. But if you've had the feeling lately that planes are becoming even more crowded, NPR's John Ydstie is here to tell you it's not your imagination.

JOHN YDSTIE, BYLINE: From the point of view of passengers sitting elbow to elbow at 30,000 feet, this year has continued a trend of record crowding. On average more than 80 percent of airline seats have been filled and plenty of flights have been packed to capacity.

Clifford Winston, a transportation expert at the Brookings Institution, says it's partly because of airline consolidation, but it's also that airlines have figured out how to make a profit - fly as full as possible.

CLIFFORD WINSTON: The airlines themselves have got their capacity discipline under control.

YDSTIE: Airlines used to be too quick to add planes and flights as the economy grew, only to be caught with too many seats in economic downturns. But in the past five years, they've cut the number of flights by 14 percent. Some midsize airports - like Cleveland and St. Louis - have lost 40 percent of their flights, and passengers can feel it.

WINSTON: Very crowded and certainly higher fares.

YDSTIE: Winston suggests a way to combat those twin ills for passengers: foreign competition.

WINSTON: In the same way that we allow foreign automakers to produce and sell cars in America, I am suggesting that we should allow foreign airlines to start serving U.S. routes.

YDSTIE: Of course U.S. airlines and their unions are likely to think that's a bad idea.

John Ydstie, NPR News, Washington.

Copyright © 2012 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.