Holiday Food That Won't Make It Through Security

The Transportation Security Administration has posted a special Thanksgiving notice on its website reminding flyers about the foods they cannot bring through the security checkpoint. The list includes: Gravy, creamy dips and spreads. A more complete list is on the TSA website.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Our last word in business goes out to all you last-minute airline travelers on this Thanksgiving Day.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And the last word is: Leave that cranberry sauce at home.

MONTAGNE: The Transportation Security Administration has posted a special Thanksgiving notice on its website, reminding flyers about the foods they cannot hand carry through the security checkpoint.

WERTHEIMER: The list includes gravy, creamy dips, spreads.

MONTAGNE: Jellies and jams are on the list, as is salsa and soups, cranberry sauce as well, as we just said. A more complete list is on the TSA website.

WERTHEIMER: If you must bring these items with you, the TSA says put them in checked luggage or carry them on board in quantities not exceeding 3.4 ounces.

MONTAGNE: Which, by our calculations would be almost enough cranberry sauce to serve yourself when you finally arrive for Thanksgiving dinner.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

WERTHEIMER: And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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