Are Black Friday Deals Unbeatable?

Not according to an analysis by pricing research firm Decide Incorporated and The Wall Street Journal. They found that many products with so-called "doorbuster" deals were available at even lower prices other times of the year — even at the same retailer.

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Today's last word in business is busting the doorbusters.

Shoppers are heading out to stores today. Many went shopping overnight to seize those Black Friday bargains. But are the deals really unbeatable?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

No. Not according to an analysis by pricing research firm Decide Incorporated and The Wall Street Journal. They found that many products with so-called doorbuster deals had deals that were available at even lower prices at other times of the year - even at the same retailer.

WERTHEIMER: For example, the department store Sears advertised a mixer on sale for Black Friday at only $319.99. But researchers found the same item was $20 cheaper back in March.

INSKEEP: They found more examples at Target, Home Depot and Best Buy, among others. So while many products are steeply discounted, it may not be the best deal ever.

WERTHEIMER: Analysts say it's always good to check prices. And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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