'Men' Actor Angus Jones Says His Show Is 'Filth'

Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep report on a plea from Angus Jones, the young actor on the hit TV show Two and a Half Men. In a video, he implores people to quit watching the show, saying it's at odds with his Christian faith.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

OK. Lorre's hit show "Two and a Half Men" may have moved on from Charlie Sheen. Now it's being attacked by another of its stars.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Angus Jones is the half a man referred to in the show's title. He debuted on the sitcom as a nine-year-old. Still on it today at age 19, but says he wishes he wasn't.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

ANGUS JONES: If you watch "Two and a Half Men," please stop watching "Two and a Half Men." I'm on "Two and a Half Men," and I don't want to be on it. Please stop watching it. Please stop filling your head with filth.

MONTAGNE: That's from a video Jones made about his new Christian faith. In it, he goes on to say that you, quote, "cannot be a true, God-fearing person and be on a raunchy sitcom like 'Two and a Half Men.'"

INSKEEP: Mr. Jones says he's stuck with a contract to appear on the show for another year, earning about $350,000 per episode.

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