Australian Police Call Apple Maps 'Life-Threatening'

Local police in the town of Mildura are urging motorists to use anything but Apple maps after the app led drivers, not to their town, but 43 miles away to a remote desert. Experts say if you do live in a major city, Apple maps should work just fine.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: lost down under.

Back in September, iPhone users slammed Apple for its new map app, which replaced Google Maps in a software update.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Users were complaining that he gave them wrong directions and showed landmarks that didn't really exist. And now law enforcement in Australia is coming down on Apple. Local police in the town of Mildura are urging motorists to use anything but Apple maps after the app led drivers, not to their town, but 43 miles away into a remote desert.

MONTAGNE: They went so far as to call using Apple maps life-threatening. Apple has since corrected the issue. Experts say if you do live in a major city, Apple maps should work just fine. But in more rural areas, they recommend you have a backup, a standalone GPS system, or even an old-fashioned paper map.

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MONTAGNE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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