NPR logo

Need A Career? Try Making Gelato

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/169305332/169305358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Need A Career? Try Making Gelato

Business

Need A Career? Try Making Gelato

Need A Career? Try Making Gelato

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/169305332/169305358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gelato University in Bologna, Italy, teaches students the art of making Gelato — Italy's creamier version of ice cream. The week-long course costs about $1,200 but it comes with a $1,200 coupon toward the purchase of a gelato maker. The school has more than 6,000 students a year.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now today's last word in business is more of a scream - ice cream.

High school seniors anxious about the high cost of college might consider an alternative. Gelato University in Bologna, Italy, teaches students the art of making gelato, Italy's creamier version of ice cream, of course. The week-long course costs about $1,200 but it comes with a $1,200 coupon toward the purchase of a gelato maker. The university, so called, has more than 6,000 students a year. And more than 15 percent of them do end up buying equipment. If there's anything that can survive a tough economy, it's ice cream.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.