Investing In Citizenship, 'Manifest Injustice' And Big Freedia

The Barclays Center in New York, the new home of the Brooklyn Nets, was built partially with investment from overseas donors seeking U.S. citizenship. A little-known immigration program allows wealthy investors to get a green card in exchange for funding American businesses. i i

The Barclays Center in New York, the new home of the Brooklyn Nets, was built partially with investment from overseas donors seeking U.S. citizenship. A little-known immigration program allows wealthy investors to get a green card in exchange for funding American businesses. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Bruce Bennett/Getty Images
The Barclays Center in New York, the new home of the Brooklyn Nets, was built partially with investment from overseas donors seeking U.S. citizenship. A little-known immigration program allows wealthy investors to get a green card in exchange for funding American businesses.

The Barclays Center in New York, the new home of the Brooklyn Nets, was built partially with investment from overseas donors seeking U.S. citizenship. A little-known immigration program allows wealthy investors to get a green card in exchange for funding American businesses.

Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

In this week's podcast of weekends on All Things Considered, the easiest way to become an American citizen: investing. Also, the 10-hour-musical, the students who made millions at poker, and the man who spent 38 years trying to get released from prison. Plus, the music of New Orleans' Big Freedia.

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