Pizza Hut Makes Eating Pizza Easier

For decades, Pizza Hut has been vigorously researching ways to improve the pizza consumption process. The company has come up with pizza sliders. Imagine pizza, but presented in cute hamburger-slider size. Each mini pizza is 3.5 inches across.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And our last word in business is: America's pizza crisis solved.

For decades, Pizza Hut has been researching ways to improve the flawed pizza consumption process. Until recent years, Americans were forced to hold the slice two-handed, you know, with the finger up under the point, or fold it in half like Spike Lee in "Do the Right Thing." Pizza Hut has never felt that was good enough, and they're trying for something better.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

You may remember The Edge, a pizza with no outer crust. Or the Cheesy Bites Pizza, which replaces a crust with the ring of 28 pieces of cheese-filled dough.

INSKEEP: Now we can announce pizza sliders - pizza presented in cute hamburger-slider sizes. Each mini pizza is 3.5 inches across in packs of three for five bucks or nine for $10.

MONTAGNE: The Wall Street Journal writes: It's a way for the chain to compete with fast food restaurants like McDonald's. Pizza Hut's owner Yum Brands said yesterday its profit is in the fourth quarter dropped 5 percent.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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