NPR logo
Potato Chip Flavors Walk On The Wild Side
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/171679138/171679656" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Potato Chip Flavors Walk On The Wild Side

Business

Potato Chip Flavors Walk On The Wild Side

Potato Chip Flavors Walk On The Wild Side
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/171679138/171679656" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lays Potato Chips is expected to announce new flavors on Tuesday. The company had a contest in which they asked for suggestions for new chip varieties.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's move on from pretzels to potato chips with our last word in business. Why not - as in - why not make potato chips that taste like chicken and waffles or cheesy garlic bread?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Or hot sauce? Why not? We imagine that's what someone at Lays Potato Chips said because these chip flavors are apparently real.

MONTAGNE: That's according to the Associated Press, L.A. Times, and a number of folks who say they've already seen the new products in stores and posted photos online - this part of a contest in which customers offer their suggestions for new chip varieties.

INSKEEP: The company is expected to make an official announcement about the winning flavors tomorrow. One must only wonder what some of the rejected ideas were.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.