Tracking A Space Rock's Streak Past Earth

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Guests

Jay Melosh, Distinguished Professor, Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University

Jonathan Bradshaw, amateur astronomer, Samford Valley Observatory

Richard Tonello, Gingin Observatory

Humberto Campins, Science team, NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission, Professor of Physics and Astronomy, University of Central Florida

Gianluca Masi, Bellatrix Observatory

Ido Bareket, Bareket Observatory

Eric Anderson, Co-founder and Co-chairman, Planetary Resources, Inc., Chairman, Space Adventures, Ltd.

Edward Lu, Chairman and CEO, B612 Foundation, Former NASA Astronaut

Alison Gibbings, PhD Researcher, Advanced Space Concepts Lab, University of Strathclyde

Asteroid 2012 DA14 is half the size of a football field, and whizzing towards the Earth at over 17,000 miles per hour. Don't worry, it won't hit us. But on Friday, February 15th it makes its closest approach, scraping by the Earth's surface closer than many satellites. Join Ira Flatow and Flora Lichtman for special live coverage of this near encounter, with first-hand reports from astronomers around the world.

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