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Oscar Swag Bag Isn't What It Used To Be

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Oscar Swag Bag Isn't What It Used To Be

Business

Oscar Swag Bag Isn't What It Used To Be

Oscar Swag Bag Isn't What It Used To Be

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/172674095/172674191" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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On Sunday, nominees who don't win an Academy Award will take home more than $47,000 worth of consolation gifts. Sounds like a nice haul but in 2010, the swag was worth more than $90,000.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is Oscar swag. On Sunday, nominees who do not win an Academy award will nevertheless take home about $47,000 worth of consolation gifts, which sounds like a lot. But in 2010, the swag was worth a lot more - more than $90,000.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This year, goodies include trips to places like Australia, Hawaii and Mexico. The gift bags may also include such useful items as hand-illustrated tennis shoes, portion-control dinnerware, and a book by Leeza Gibbons.

INSKEEP: A little something for you there. The least extravagant but actually, handy item is some Windex touch-up cleaner. Oh, and apologies to the runner-ups for Best Animated Short. The Windex and luxury vacations only go to celebrity nominees from the major award categories.

WERTHEIMER: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News.

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