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The Bryan Ferry Orchestra On World Cafe

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The Bryan Ferry Orchestra On World Cafe

The Bryan Ferry Orchestra On World Cafe

The Bryan Ferry Orchestra On World Cafe

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Bryan Ferry. Adam Whitehead/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Adam Whitehead/Courtesy of the artist

Bryan Ferry.

Adam Whitehead/Courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "Slave To Love"
  • "Don't Stop The Dance"
  • "Love Is The Drug"

Web Extra

"Reason Or Rhyme"

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Bryan Ferry says he only listens to 1920s jazz these days — and The Jazz Age, the new album from The Bryan Ferry Orchestra, backs up that claim. The Jazz Age finds Ferry doing a lot of listening, as he neither sings nor plays on the record.

Instead, the same musician whose band Roxy Music redefined art-pop — and helped shape the New Romantic scene in the '70s and early '80s — has allowed Colin Good to rearrange his old material. The result is 13 instrumental jazz versions of songs chosen from among 11 albums, from 1972's Roxy Music to Ferry's most recent solo set, 2010's Olympia.

In this installment of World Cafe, The Bryan Ferry Orchestra plays a few pieces from The Jazz Age, and Ferry and Good discuss the making of the album with host David Dye.

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