Fresh Air Weekend: 'Whitey Bulger,' 'Salt Sugar Fat' And Historical Language

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

An early mug shot shows James "Whitey" Bulger in 1953. i i

hide captionAn early mug shot shows James "Whitey" Bulger in 1953.

Boston Police
An early mug shot shows James "Whitey" Bulger in 1953.

An early mug shot shows James "Whitey" Bulger in 1953.

Boston Police

Whitey Bulger Bio Profiles Boston's Most Notorious Gangster: Reporters Kevin Cullen and Shelley Murphy, who covered Bulger for years for The Boston Globe, have a new book out about the career criminal. Bulger was wanted for 19 murders when he was captured by the FBI in 2011. He faces trial in June.

How The Food Industry Manipulates Taste Buds With 'Salt Sugar Fat': From food scientists who study the human palate to maximize consumer bliss, to marketing campaigns that target teens to hook them for life on a brand, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Moss' new book goes inside the world of processed, packaged goods.

Historical Vocab: When We Get It Wrong, Does It Matter?: We're living in an age obsessed with authenticity, says linguist Geoff Nunberg, but we often choose to nitpick the wrong details. Whether it's Downton Abbey, Mad Men, Lincoln or Argo, Nunberg argues, a historical novel or screenplay should give us a translation, not a transcription.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

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