Dietary Determination: Under Government Purview?

Host Scott Simon tells us about the new "anti-Bloomberg" law in Mississippi, which bars cities and towns from passing local laws to limit portion sizes. What do you think? Please tell us on Twitter, @NPRWeekend.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Lawmakers in Mississippi take a contrary approach. This week the state legislature overwhelmingly approved what they're calling the Anti-Bloomberg Bill. Mississippi cities and towns are now barred from passing local laws to limit portion sizes. State law still requires franchises with more than 20 outlets to list dietary information.

Mississippi State Senator Tony Smith who, by the way, owns a chain of five barbeque restaurants, wrote the bill, saying Bloomberg-style laws are a bother to small businesses. Governor Phil Bryant signed it saying, it's simply not the role of government to micro-regulate citizens' dietary decisions. Senator Smith says local governments can use their energy to make more community gardens and farmers markets; put physical education into schools and send healthy food messages out on social media.

So what do you think? Please tell us on Twitter @nprweekend and I'm @nprscottsimon.

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