Movie Review: 'Gimme The Loot'

Gimme The Loot is a new independent film that's had a charmed life, including winning the best narrative prize at South by Southwest and an appearance at Cannes. The comedy is written and director by Adam Leon.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

"Gimme The Loot" is a new independent film that's had a charmed life, including winning the Best Narrative prize at South by Southwest and an appearance at the Cannes Film Festival. Los Angeles Times and Morning Edition film critic Kenneth Turan says it's worth the fuss.

KENNETH TURAN, BYLINE: We meet Malcolm and Sofia as they're stealing spray paint from a hardware store.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "GIMME THE LOOT")

TASHIANA WASHINGTON: (Unintelligible)

TURAN: They're committed graffiti writers and best friends, living in the grittiest part of the Bronx. He's easy-going and affable while she is unapologetically fierce.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "GIMME THE LOOT")

WASHINGTON: (as Sofia) All right. Listen, listen, listen. So this is what we're gonna do. Don't you want to trade some (unintelligible) working Shea Stadium?

TY HICKSON: (as Malcolm) You mean Citi Field where the Mets play at?

WASHINGTON: (as Sofia) Citi? Dude, I'm not calling it after some stupid bank. It's called Shea Stadium. And do you know (beep) or not?

HICKSON: (as Malcolm) Who?

WASHINGTON: (as Sofia) Fool. (beeping) paid you or some (beep)?

TURAN: The action gets going when a rival group of taggers defaces one of their rooftop masterpieces. Malcolm and Sofia fume about not getting any respect and wonder what they can do to make the world sit up and take notice. Then inspiration strikes.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "GIMME THE LOOT")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Anybody who is living up in this fine city knows that when someone on the Mets hits a homerun, this goofy apple pops out of the stands and everybody goes crazy.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: Man, come on.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Somebody's going to write graffiti on that apple and their name's just going to ring out in our world.

TURAN: It turns out that Malcolm and Sofia have a weekend to come up with $500 to gain access to the stadium and immortality. It's one of the most venerable of movie tropes to make characters complete a task while the clock is ticking. But writer-director Adam Leon's gift is for people, for getting natural, likable performances out of his actors.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "GIMME THE LOOT")

WASHINGTON: (as Sofia) You're always saying, oh, we're going to be the biggest brands in New York City. Well, do what you're gonna do to make that happen.

TURAN: "Gimme the Loot's" off the cuff bravado perfectly captures the texture of youthful exuberance even though it's only 81 minutes long and was shot on the fly in a variety of New York locations. Malcolm and Sophia are not exactly a latter day Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland, but they are two kids trying their hardest to put on their own kind of show.

Will they get what they want, what they need, or something in between? The only sure thing is that being along for the ride on a day they won't forget is unforgettable for us as well.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: That's Kenneth Turan. He reviews movies for MORNING EDITION and also for the Los Angeles Times.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: And you're listening to MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Copyright © 2013 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.