April 1-7: An MIA Mom, A Deluded Romance And Homegrown Terrorism

Where'd You Go, Bernadette

Where'd You Go, Bernadette

by Maria Semple

Bee Fox is a nice kid, a good musician and a great student. But her mother, Bernadette, is notorious. To her Microsoft-guru husband, she's a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she's a disgrace; to design mavens, she's a revolutionary architect. Then, Bernadette goes missing and Bee begins a search for her mother that will take her to the ends of the earth.

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Beautiful Ruins

Beautiful Ruins

by Jess Walter

On a rocky patch of Italian coastline, circa 1962, a daydreaming young innkeeper has an almost-love affair with a beautiful American starlet. She draws him into her glittering world, from the lavish set of Cleopatra to the shabby revelry of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival to the back lots of contemporary Hollywood, and both begin to cling to an improbable dream.

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The New Republic

The New Republic

Edgar Kellogg has always yearned to be popular. When he leaves his lucrative law career for a foreign correspondent post in a Portuguese backwater with a homegrown terrorist movement, Edgar recognizes the disappeared reporter he's replacing as the larger-than-life character he longs to be. Yet all is not as it appears. A tongue-in-cheek take on terrorism, The New Republic also presses a more intimate question: What makes particular people so magnetic, while the rest of us inspire a shrug?

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Some Assembly Required

Some Assembly Required

A Journal Of My Son's First Son

by Anne Lamott and Sam Lamott

Anne Lamott has entered a new and unexpected chapter in her life: grandmotherhood. Stunned to learn that her son, Sam, is about to become a father at 19, Lamott begins a journal about the first year of her grandson's life. Some Assembly Required is the true story of how the birth of a baby changes a family and redefines each member's role.

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God's Hotel

God's Hotel

A Doctor, a Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine

San Francisco's Laguna Honda Hospital is the last almshouse in the country, a descendant of the Hotel-Dieu (God's Hotel) that cared for the sick during the Middle Ages. It's also where Dr. Victoria Sweet learned a kind of attentive medicine that has almost vanished. God's Hotel chronicles the more than 20 years Sweet spent working at the hospital.

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* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

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