YouTube Announcement Scares Some

The video-sharing website announced on Sunday that it was shutting down. Executives said the site was actually designed as an 8-year contest to find the best video on the web. Just a reminder, the announcement was made early — on the day before April Fools Day.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is one of this year's contenders for highest profile April Fools joke.

The video-sharing website YouTube announced yesterday it's shutting down.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In a video message, YouTube executives said that the whole site was actually designed as an eight-year contest to find the best video on the web. Well, eight years are up. And now panel of experts, the company said, will spend the next decade watching everything uploaded on the site to choose a winner.

SALAR KAMANGAR: We always said that this shouldn't be a popularity contest. "Gangnam Style" has the same chance of winning as a video with 40 views of a man feeding bread to a duck.

KASSEM G: Of course, I'm hoping to win, but even if I've inspired just one person to go out and harass people on the beach, that's something I still feel pretty good about.

INSKEEP: That fake announcement brings to mind something that somebody said yesterday on Twitter, that our ability to distribute interesting content has far exceeded our ability to create it.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

Copyright © 2013 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.