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'Mad Magazine' Illustrator Bob Clarke Dies At 87
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'Mad Magazine' Illustrator Bob Clarke Dies At 87

Business

'Mad Magazine' Illustrator Bob Clarke Dies At 87

'Mad Magazine' Illustrator Bob Clarke Dies At 87
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/176104584/176104557" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Clarke started at the magazine in 1956. He drew cover boy Alfred E. Neuman and features like Spy Vs Spy. Editors said his legacy was "massive." and he will be greatly missed.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: what, me worry?

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

That's the slogan of the long-running satirical Mad magazine and its cover boy, the gap-toothed Alfred E. Neuman.

INSKEEP: Sorry to tell you that Bob Clarke, one of the early illustrators who brought Alfred E. to life, died this week at age 87. Starting at the magazine in 1956, Clarke also drew features like "Spy Vs Spy" and "Believe-It-Or-Nots," a parody of Ripley's "Believe It or Not."

GREENE: Mad magazine editors said his legacy was massive and he will be greatly missed. Clarke continued working on Mad's staff - or the usual gang of idiots, as they call themselves - until just three years ago.

That is the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

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