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Listen To An Interview With Gillian Welch And David Rawlings

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Gillian Welch And David Rawlings On World Cafe

World Cafe: Sense Of Place

Gillian Welch And David Rawlings On World Cafe

Listen To An Interview With Gillian Welch And David Rawlings

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/176156546/176691344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

David Rawlings and Gillian Welch. Mark Seliger/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Mark Seliger/Courtesy of the artist

David Rawlings and Gillian Welch.

Mark Seliger/Courtesy of the artist

For World Cafe's Sense of Place: Nashville edition, we knew we wanted to talk with Gillian Welch and David Rawlings to get their take on changes in the city over the last couple of decades. The country-folk singer-songwriters moved to Nashville in 1993 and have worked there ever since, recording at historic studios like RCA Studio B before buying the legendary Woodland Studios.

Their acoustic sound draws inspiration from country brother bands such as The Delmore Brothers and The Louvin Brothers. Welch and Rawlings have made iconic records spanning from their first together, Revival, to Welch's latest, The Harrow and the Harvest.

Listen to our extended conversation with the duo, in which Welch and Rawlings touch on their experiences in Nashville over the last 20 years. Along the way, they discuss both how the city has changed and what they find unique about their adopted hometown.

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