April 15-21: Courage, Corn Tortillas And Country Music

The Favored Daughter

The Favored Daughter

One Woman's Fight to Lead Afghanistan Into the Future

by Fawzia Koofi and Nadene Gourhi

Paperback, 266 pages, St Martins Pr, $17, published April 16 2013 | purchase

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Title
The Favored Daughter
Subtitle
One Woman's Fight to Lead Afghanistan Into the Future
Author
Fawzia Koofi and Nadene Gourhi

Your purchase helps support NPR Programming. How?

After she was born, Fawzia Koofi, the 19th daughter of a local village leader in rural Afghanistan, was left to die in the sun by her mother. Against all odds, Koofi survived and went on to become Afghanistan's first female deputy speaker of Parliament. She shares her story in a memoir that's punctuated by a series of letters she wrote to her own two daughters in which she describes the future and freedoms she hopes they and all of Afghanistan's women might one day enjoy.

News and Reviews
Taco USA

Taco USA

How Mexican Food Conquered America

by Gustavo Arellano

Paperback, 310 pages, Simon & Schuster, $16, published April 16 2013 | purchase

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Title
Taco USA
Subtitle
How Mexican Food Conquered America
Author
Gustavo Arellano

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For 50 years, the taco has been a staple of American life. It's in school lunches and Michelin-star restaurants; it even helped launch the food truck craze. So how did the taco come to loom so large in American bellies? Gustavo Arellano explains our love of all things folded into a tortilla.

News and Reviews
Air Castle of the South

Air Castle Of The South

WSM and the Making of Music City

by Craig Havighurst

Paperback, 320 pages, Univ of Illinois Pr, $27.95, published April 15 2013 | purchase

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Title
Air Castle of the South
Subtitle
WSM and the Making of Music City
Author
Craig Havighurst

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When a proposal to pull country music from the Nashville radio station WSM sparked public outcry in 2002, Craig Havighurst scoured new and existing sources to document the station's effect on the city's character and self-image.

News and Reviews

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

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