Boston Police Report No Suspects In Marathon Attack

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block have more on the Boston Marathon attack that injured dozens of people.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And we turn now to WBUR's Steve Brown in Boston. And, Steve, you were watching that briefing a little while ago. As we've mentioned, the authority is now saying three people have died, more than 100 injured. We've been watching those numbers climb. What else can you tell us about what officials had to say?

STEVE BROWN, BYLINE: Well, Governor Deval Patrick says the city of Boston will be open tomorrow, but it will not be business as usual. He's telling citizens to be...

BLOCK: And I'm afraid we've lost our connection with Steve Brown in Boston. Robert, the - Steve, are you back? Yeah. We were just hearing Governor Patrick talking about what he called a horrific day there in Boston. And the story has been unfolding through the day. Not much information yet about who might be responsible - no information about who might be responsible.

BROWN: No. As we've said, investigators are now on the scene, along with the Joint Terrorism Task Force. And to walk us through how this kind of investigation works, we're joined now by Bryan - oh, I'm - Steve Brown is back.

BLOCK: Steve Brown is back.

BROWN: Yes, I'm back.

BLOCK: Steve, sorry, we lost your connection there.

BROWN: That's OK.

BLOCK: And what were you telling us about what else...

BROWN: Well, I was saying that it's going to be heightened security in the downtown area, about two- or three-block area around the Boylston Street, the finish line. That's closed off. It's sealed off. National Guard troops are there. Just allowing residents to get into that area, you have to show ID to get in - to get back to your homes in that area.

BLOCK: And in terms of the investigation itself, Steve, Boston police are saying they do not have suspects.

BROWN: They don't. There was a rumor going around that they were talking to somebody of interest at one of the hospitals. Police Commissioner Ed Davis said that absolutely not - they do not have a person at the hospital that they're talking to. They're talking to a number of people. They will not say, though, that it's a person of interest, or people of interest. They're just talking to people.

BLOCK: Yeah. There have also been reports throughout the day, Steve, of other suspicious packages, suspicious devices being found. What did the Boston police commissioner have to say about that?

BROWN: Again, the fact that a lot of people dropped things, so they're checking everything out around the way. A lot of - people are kind of a gun-shy right now after what had happened there. So now, they're getting a lot of reports of things that are usually innocuous, are innocuous. But people are just kind of extra concerned.

BLOCK: Mm-hmm. But no actual explosive devices that were found?

BROWN: Not that I'm aware of.

BLOCK: OK.

BROWN: There was one device that I know that they - it exploded - the bomb squad came in and exploded sometime after the initial explosions, probably about 45 minutes after that. But I'm not aware of any others.

BLOCK: OK. That's WBUR's Steve Brown in Boston. Steve, thank you.

BROWN: Thank you.

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