Boston Marathon Changes In An Instant

At least 3 people were killed and dozens injured by two explosions that occurred near the finish line of Monday's Boston Marathon. Hours of struggle and accomplishment changed in an instant Monday afternoon.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I'm David Greene.

Let's work through what we know about yesterday's explosions at the Boston Marathon.

INSKEEP: Hours of struggle and accomplishment changed in an instant. Mirabelle Garcia had just finished running her ninth Boston Marathon.

MIRABELLE GARCIA: As soon as I crossed the finish line, I heard the explosion. And I turned back, and that's when I said, what's going on? And everybody was just running everywhere, yelling, freaking out, crying.

GREENE: She saw glass raining down. She saw the blood of runners and spectators.

GARCIA: And I know that some of the people that were right behind me got badly hurt. And it looked like a movie.

INSKEEP: Amazingly, some runners kept moving toward the finish line. In the hours after the explosions, President Obama warned against jumping to conclusions.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: We're still in the investigation stage, at this point. But I just want to reiterate, we will find out who did this, and we will hold them accountable.

GREENE: That was President Obama yesterday.

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