KLM Offers An Out Of This World Trip

To win a journey into space, contestants have to correctly guess how far up a high-altitude balloon can make it before popping. Guesses submitted on KLM's website will be tested April 22, when the company releases a balloon in the Nevada desert.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: out of this world - which is where the Dutch airline KLM will send two lucky customers at the start of next year -space, the final frontier.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. To win the space journey, contestants have to correctly guess how far up a high-altitude balloon can make it before popping. Piece of cake - I know that's what you're thinking, right? Guesses submitted on KLM's website will be tested on April 22nd, when the company releases a balloon in the Nevada desert.

INSKEEP: The winners will take flight next January. Now to be clear, they will not rise on a balloon that pops. A feat that would earn you a Darwin Award, but they will go on a commercial spacecraft.

And David, we do know precisely how high that trip will go - 338,000 feet.

GREENE: That's high.

INSKEEP: Yeah. That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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