Sound Montage: Remembering A Busy News Week

At the end of a week of many tough news stories, David Greene and Steve Inskeep look back at the week with sound of people and places in the news.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. Minute by minute throughout this morning we're tracking events out of Boston to understand where we are. Let's also review this week briefly to understand where we have been.

(SOUNDBITE OF EXPLOSION)

ED DAVIS: At 2:50 PM there were simultaneous explosions that occurred along the route of the Boston Marathon near the finish line.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

That's Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis talking about those events Monday. Now, the FBI, by sifting through a mass of photos and surveillance footage, was able to identify two suspects yesterday, two men seen carrying bags and wearing baseball caps. They released photos to the public asking for help.

Last night the story continued in Cambridge.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Where is that ALS unit? Officer down. Where are the ALS units? Please.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #5: We're working it, we're working it, trying to get it there.

INSKEEP: We heard the sounds - an officer down - in that radio recording there. An MIT police officer was shot and killed on the university campus following a nearby robbery. There was also a carjacking of a Mercedes SUV and then the story, along with two suspects from the bombing apparently moved to Watertown where police discovered the car and engaged those suspects.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNSHOTS)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #3: You guys got rifles?

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #4: No!

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #5: No!

GREENE: That's YouTube audio from the shootout captured by a Watertown resident. This is what Watertown residents woke up to this morning. Now, Suspect Number One, the man in the black hat, was shot and later died at the hospital. Suspect Two remains at large.

At a press conference earlier this morning, state Homeland Security official Kurt Schwartz offered a warning.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

KURT SCHWARTZ: To the residents of Watertown, Newton, Waltham, Belmont, Cambridge, and the Allston-Brighton neighborhoods of Boston we are asking you to stay home, stay indoors. We're asking businesses not to open. We're asking people not to congregate outside. We're asking people not to go to mass transit.

INSKEEP: Colonel Timothy Alben of the Massachusetts State Police says the manhunt continues into this morning.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATEMENT)

COLONEL TIM ALBEN: Our immediate concern is for those people in that neighborhood up there. We have an active search going on by tactical teams to locate and apprehend this particular individual. He should be considered armed and dangerous and is a threat to anybody that might approach him.

INSKEEP: OK. So that's where we've been. Now let's talk about where we are. Our colleague Dina Temple-Raston, counterterrorism correspondent has now confirmed that these two suspects, the one in the black hat who is dead, the one in the white hat still is at large - are described as brothers from Chechnya. These are two men from Chechnya, brothers, who are accused of bombing the Boston Marathon and who led police on a chase overnight.

We'll bring you more as we learn it right here on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

GREENE: And I'm David Greene.

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