Marathon Beer Proceeds To Go To Bombing Victims

Boston Beer Company has sponsored the marathon for years — even brewing a special beer for the event: 26.2 Brew. The company says it's going to donate all 2013 proceeds of that beer to a local charity that helps families touched by the tragedy.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And on this Friday, our last word in business comes in the form of a toast - to the Boston Beer Company, the maker of brews including Samuel Adams.

Seventy employees were on the route of the Boston Marathon last week when the bombs exploded.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The company has sponsored the marathon for years, even brewing a special beer for the event: the 26.2 Brew - which we presume refers to the number of miles in a marathon and not the percentage of alcohol. The company says it's going to donate all 2013 proceeds of that beer to a local charity that helps families touched by the tragedy.

MONTAGNE: It has pledge next year's profits too. The Boston Globe reports the company has also filed a trademark application to rename its marathon beer - Boston Strong. That mantra emerged after the attack.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Here's to you, Boston. Cheers.

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