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Company Touts Shirt That Could Be Worn 100 Days In A Row

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Company Touts Shirt That Could Be Worn 100 Days In A Row

Business

Company Touts Shirt That Could Be Worn 100 Days In A Row

Company Touts Shirt That Could Be Worn 100 Days In A Row

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/179992123/179992966" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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U.S. company Wool and Prince says it has developed a wool shirt so odor resistant you could wear it for 100 days in a row without washing it. The company says the key is that wool is more efficient than other fabrics at absorbing sweat and evaporating it into the air.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. So that's a vision of L.A.'s future. Our last word in business is a vision for clothes of the future.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In particular, it's a dress shirt for those who are tired of the effort to look dressy. The American company Wool and Prince says it has developed a wool shirt so odor resistant you could wear it for 100 days in a row without washing it.

INSKEEP: The shirts are also alleged to be wrinkle free and so never need to be ironed. The company says the key here is that wool is more efficient than other fabrics at absorbing sweat and evaporating it into the air.

MONTAGNE: A spokesman says the company does not expect anyone to really go months without washing the shirt. But the spokesman says if you do want to go for the 100 day challenge we aren't going to stop you.

INSKEEP: Maybe they're not. But just remember, it's sort of like secondhand smoke: if you take this test, your loved ones, friends and close colleagues will, in effect, be taking it too.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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