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The Movie Derek Cianfrance Has 'Seen A Million Times'

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The Movie Derek Cianfrance Has 'Seen A Million Times'

The Movie Derek Cianfrance Has 'Seen A Million Times'

The Movie Derek Cianfrance Has 'Seen A Million Times'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/177055019/181410306" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Derek Cianfrance's favorite scene from Goodfellas.

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

The movie that writer-director Derek Cianfrance, whose credits include the films Blue Valentine and The Place Beyond the Pines — currently in theaters — could watch a million times is Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas.


Writer-director Derek Cianfrance Chris Young/AP hide caption

toggle caption Chris Young/AP

Writer-director Derek Cianfrance

Chris Young/AP

Interview Highlights

On why he loved Goodfellas the first time he watched it

"It felt like the best movie I had ever seen. It had the best performances. It had the best use of music and period music, no real score."

On why he thinks the movie was robbed at the Oscars

"You know, flash-forward, like, March of 1991, the Academy Awards, I couldn't believe that Dances With Wolves was winning the best picture over Goodfellas. I mean, to this day, does anyone really think that Dances With Wolves is a better movie than Goodfellas? I certainly don't."

On what the film means to him

"You know, as a filmmaker, as a film lover, it's a film to aspire to make, and I'm just so thankful that Scorsese made it and it's out there in the world. You know, it's like a friend of mine, you know? I can watch it and feel like I'm visiting an old pal."

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