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Teen Solves Online Spoiler Frustrations

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Teen Solves Online Spoiler Frustrations

Business

Teen Solves Online Spoiler Frustrations

Teen Solves Online Spoiler Frustrations

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/182516883/182517046" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The Internet spreads information too quickly for some people — especially people who don't want to find out the ending of a show they haven't seen yet. A high school senior in New Hampshire has solved that problem with an app.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Today's last word in business is another high-tech solution. The Internet spreads information swiftly, of course, too quickly for some people - especially people who don't want to find out the ending of a show they haven't seen yet.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Online spoilers frustrated a 17-year-old New Hampshire high school senior, Jenny Lemaire.

JENNY LEMAIRE: Well, I really like "Pretty Little Liars," and they often have hashtags trending on Twitter and one of them just gave away who one of the bad guys was. So that really spoiled the episode for me, and that was really disappointing.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Don't you hate when that happens? Well, like any good software programmer, Lemaire came up with an app which won the grand prize at a recent hack-a-thon. She calls it TwiVo - as in Twitter plus TiVo.

INSKEEP: Of course. You plug-in keywords like the name of a TV show, and the app then hides the contents of all tweets that mention those words - no more spoilers.

GREENE: We can't use the app just yet. Lemaire says she still needs to tweak it for general use. Spoiler alert: She's going to make the tweaks after she finishes her final week of high school.

INSKEEP: David, I didn't want to know that yet.

GREENE: All right. Sorry, Steve. I'm sorry.

INSKEEP: All right.

GREENE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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