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Gas Scare Attributed To Firm's Educational Cards

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Gas Scare Attributed To Firm's Educational Cards

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Gas Scare Attributed To Firm's Educational Cards

Gas Scare Attributed To Firm's Educational Cards

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A natural gas company in Great Falls, Montana, wanted to educate consumers. So it printed 25,000 scratch-and-sniff cards to show how a gas leak would smell. Then the company tossed some of the cards. As they were crushed in a garbage truck, the gas smell filled the town.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

A natural gas company in Great Falls, Mont., wanted to educate consumers. So it printed up 25,000 scratch-and-sniff cards to show how a gas leak would smell. Then yesterday, the company tossed some of the cards. And as they were crushed in a garbage truck, the gas smell filled the town.

Several buildings were evacuated after people reported gas leaks. The company apologized, but said that their campaign, in a sense, worked.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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