Memory Games : TED Radio Hour Memory is malleable, dynamic and elusive. In this hour, TED speakers discuss how a nimble memory can improve your life, and how a frail one might ruin someone else's.

"We all look through family albums. We all hear stories at the dinner table. ... They become incorporated into what we believe we actually remember." — Scott Fraser Marc Grimberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Grimberg/Getty Images
"We all look through family albums. We all hear stories at the dinner table. ... They become incorporated into what we believe we actually remember." — Scott Fraser

"We all look through family albums. We all hear stories at the dinner table. ... They become incorporated into what we believe we actually remember." — Scott Fraser

Marc Grimberg/Getty Images

Memory Games

Memory is malleable, dynamic and elusive. In this hour, TED speakers discuss how a nimble memory can improve your life, and how a frail one might ruin someone else's.

Memory is malleable, dynamic and elusive. In this hour, TED speakers discuss how a nimble memory can improve your life, and how a frail one might ruin someone else's.

Forensic psychologist Scott Fraser says, "all of our memories, put simply, are reconstructed memories." TEDxUSC hide caption

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TEDxUSC

Can Eyewitnesses Create Memories?

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Daniel Kahneman says, "we tend to confuse memories with the real experience that gave rise to those memories." James Duncan Davidson/TED / James Duncan Davidson hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED / James Duncan Davidson

How Do Experiences Become Memories?

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Joshua Foer says that one past memory champion developed a technique to remember more than 4,000 binary digits in half an hour. James Duncan Davidson hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson

Can Anyone Learn To Be A Master Memorizer?

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